“I started at a new school and I’m getting great employability skills.” …

NSW Business Chamber- Old School/New School Forum

This month, our College Principal and Student Leaders  Grace Faulkner, Jasper Dryden and Emily McGrath attended the NSW Business Chambers old school/new school forum.

If the next generation is to be ready for study and work, responsibility must be shared by government, educators, parents, students and industry. This is one of the findings of the report released today by the NSW Business Chamber entitled, Old School/New School.
Illawarra Business Chamber Executive Director, Chris Lamont, said it was vital the school curriculum is redesigned and delivers education outcomes that ensure students are prepared for work or further study.  A quality education should allow graduates from the school system to contribute from day one on the job.

The NSW Business Chamber is calling on education authorities to build enterprise skills into the school curriculum and start measuring them from Year 9 on.  The Report outlines what a ‘New School’ system would look like:
Responsibility is shared by Government, educators, parents, students and industry.
Innovative ways of teaching and learning, as well as tried and tested approaches are implemented Australia-wide.
Evidence informed practice is supported and educators have the knowledge they need to succeed.
Teachers are celebrated for their success, attracting the best and brightest.
Schools harness technology to facilitate a richer learning experience for students.
Education is inclusive and all students have the opportunity to learn and succeed.
Schools promote educational pathways that help realise the potential of all young people.

“Many employers advise that far too many young people they interview don’t have basic literacy and numeracy skills to start work when they finish year 12,” said Chris Lamont.

The Report notes the importance of supporting teachers and a revamped High School Certificate that provides greater access and recognition for achievement in vocational pathways as well as tertiary studies.

“A quality education is more important than ever.  Reforms to the education system must ensure quality education outcomes in literacy and numeracy and enterprise skills to improve employability or there is a risk the next generation will face an even greater struggle in securing employment,” said Chris Lamont (visit the link here)

Pledge your support for the initiatives by clicking here

Hear our students speak about learning in the 21st Century:

Watch more: